Behaviour management: myth or monster?

  Myth Children’s behaviour must be externally managed by one psychological approach – reward them when they get it right, punish them when they get it wrong. Behaviour has to be managed from the outside, children can’t be trusted to make their own futures and they have to be pushed, extrinsically motivated. The worse the behaviour, the more forceful and unpleasant the punishment required. Children […]

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Teaching, relationship and children’s mental health

The problem Are good teacher/student relationships important in promoting children’s mental health? When the subject of children’s behaviour comes up, teacher/student relationship is always mentioned as an important factor in the development of good behaviour. Good relationships engender good behaviour, good learning and good memories of school too. When we talk about behaviour it’s not usually good behaviour that’s the main topic. Good behaviour gets […]

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Solutions for behaviour – No white lines, fewer crashes

Removing the white lines on roads results in drivers taking more responsibility for keeping themselves safe. More safety, fewer crashes. That’s an odd idea isn’t it? But I must say that it often strikes me that when I’ve got so many signs, lines and instructions to pay attention to it’s almost impossible to watch the clock that tells me how fast I’m going. As Simon […]

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Solutions for behaviour – Behaviour and Snake Oil

                               Sixty second summary If we were designing our approach to helping children behave well in school today, we wouldn’t start from where we are now. The reward and punishment approach has been subjected to a long field-trial, a natural experiment, which shows up its limitations. It produces segregation of a large minority of children and promotes exclusion. It’s largely unchallenged and is vociferously […]

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